Herbert Charles Montgomery - Lieutenant - 1924 - 2016


Herbert Charles MONTGOMERY (1924 - 2016)

 
Obituary
  • "Our deepest sympathy on your Father's passing. He was a..."
    - Kimberlee McKinnon
 

 
MONTGOMERY, Herbert Charles
November 13, 1924 – January 9, 2016

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Herb on January 9, 2016. He was predeceased by his wife Marjorie, who passed away on July 8, 2015. Herb grew up in Outremont, Quebec. In 1936, the Montgomery family discovered Lake Louisa, Quebec, which became his favourite place on earth. Herb enlisted in the RCNVR and served as a Lieutenant on the HMCS Magog in WWII. After the war, he attended McGill University and attained a BSc. in Chemistry. He married his Lake Louisa sweetheart Marjorie in 1948 and they were married for 67 years. Herb had a long and successful career with Canada Colours and Chemicals Limited. In his retirement, he initiated the development of the Canadian Association of Chemical Distributors. He was always actively involved in his community. Herb was the president of a local chapter of the Canadian Cancer Society, served as the President of the York Central Hospital Foundation, was the People's Warden for St. Mary's and St. Aidan's Anglican churches. At Lake Louisa he served as the President of the Lake Louisa Country Club and was also one of the founding members of the Lake Louisa Property Owners Association. He was active on the Board of the Dunany Golf Club. Herb loved golfing, "puttering", and taking pictures of Lake Louisa sunsets. He authored two books on the history of the Lake Louisa area. He touched many people with his kindness and compassion. Herb was loved, admired and respected by everyone who knew him, especially his family. He was a loving father, grandfather, great-grandfather and uncle. Herb will be greatly missed by his children Richard (Sandy), Leslie Comfort (Todd), Marianne Ford (Bruce); his grandchildren; Michelle (Jason), Alyssa, Katherine, Davis and Madeline and his great-grandchildren Kurtis and Kaitlyn. He cherished his family and was proud of each and every one of them. A celebration of his life will be held at the Lachute Golf Club on Saturday, May 21, 2016 from 1-5 p.m. For those who wish, donations can be made to St. Aidan's Anglican Church, Wentworth, or to the Ottawa Heart Institute. Arrangements entrusted to the J.P. MacKimmie Funeral Home, 660 rue Principale, Lachute.
Published in The Ottawa Citizen on Jan. 16, 2016
- See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/ottawacitizen/obituary.aspx?pid=177322636#sthash.bk8pC8wC.dpuf

Herbert Charles MONTGOMERY (1924 - 2016)

 
Obituary
  • "Our deepest sympathy on your Father's passing. He was a..."
    - Kimberlee McKinnon
 

 
MONTGOMERY, Herbert Charles
November 13, 1924 – January 9, 2016

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Herb on January 9, 2016. He was predeceased by his wife Marjorie, who passed away on July 8, 2015. Herb grew up in Outremont, Quebec. In 1936, the Montgomery family discovered Lake Louisa, Quebec, which became his favourite place on earth. Herb enlisted in the RCNVR and served as a Lieutenant on the HMCS Magog in WWII. After the war, he attended McGill University and attained a BSc. in Chemistry. He married his Lake Louisa sweetheart Marjorie in 1948 and they were married for 67 years. Herb had a long and successful career with Canada Colours and Chemicals Limited. In his retirement, he initiated the development of the Canadian Association of Chemical Distributors. He was always actively involved in his community. Herb was the president of a local chapter of the Canadian Cancer Society, served as the President of the York Central Hospital Foundation, was the People's Warden for St. Mary's and St. Aidan's Anglican churches. At Lake Louisa he served as the President of the Lake Louisa Country Club and was also one of the founding members of the Lake Louisa Property Owners Association. He was active on the Board of the Dunany Golf Club. Herb loved golfing, "puttering", and taking pictures of Lake Louisa sunsets. He authored two books on the history of the Lake Louisa area. He touched many people with his kindness and compassion. Herb was loved, admired and respected by everyone who knew him, especially his family. He was a loving father, grandfather, great-grandfather and uncle. Herb will be greatly missed by his children Richard (Sandy), Leslie Comfort (Todd), Marianne Ford (Bruce); his grandchildren; Michelle (Jason), Alyssa, Katherine, Davis and Madeline and his great-grandchildren Kurtis and Kaitlyn. He cherished his family and was proud of each and every one of them. A celebration of his life will be held at the Lachute Golf Club on Saturday, May 21, 2016 from 1-5 p.m. For those who wish, donations can be made to St. Aidan's Anglican Church, Wentworth, or to the Ottawa Heart Institute. Arrangements entrusted to the J.P. MacKimmie Funeral Home, 660 rue Principale, Lachute.
Published in The Ottawa Citizen on Jan. 16, 2016
- See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/ottawacitizen/obituary.aspx?pid=177322636#sthash.bk8pC8wC.dpuf
MONTGOMERY, Herbert Charles
November 13, 1924 – January 9, 2016

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Herb on January 9, 2016. He was predeceased by his wife Marjorie, who passed away on July 8, 2015. Herb grew up in Outremont, Quebec. In 1936, the Montgomery family discovered Lake Louisa, Quebec, which became his favourite place on earth. Herb enlisted in the RCNVR and served as a Lieutenant on the HMCS Magog in WWII. After the war, he attended McGill University and attained a BSc. in Chemistry. He married his Lake Louisa sweetheart Marjorie in 1948 and they were married for 67 years. Herb had a long and successful career with Canada Colours and Chemicals Limited. In his retirement, he initiated the development of the Canadian Association of Chemical Distributors. He was always actively involved in his community. Herb was the president of a local chapter of the Canadian Cancer Society, served as the President of the York Central Hospital Foundation, was the People's Warden for St. Mary's and St. Aidan's Anglican churches. At Lake Louisa he served as the President of the Lake Louisa Country Club and was also one of the founding members of the Lake Louisa Property Owners Association. He was active on the Board of the Dunany Golf Club. Herb loved golfing, "puttering", and taking pictures of Lake Louisa sunsets. He authored two books on the history of the Lake Louisa area. He touched many people with his kindness and compassion. Herb was loved, admired and respected by everyone who knew him, especially his family. He was a loving father, grandfather, great-grandfather and uncle. Herb will be greatly missed by his children Richard (Sandy), Leslie Comfort (Todd), Marianne Ford (Bruce); his grandchildren; Michelle (Jason), Alyssa, Katherine, Davis and Madeline and his great-grandchildren Kurtis and Kaitlyn. He cherished his family and was proud of each and every one of them. A celebration of his life will be held at the Lachute Golf Club on Saturday, May 21, 2016 from 1-5 p.m. For those who wish, donations can be made to St. Aidan's Anglican Church, Wentworth, or to the Ottawa Heart Institute. Arrangements entrusted to the J.P. MacKimmie Funeral Home, 660 rue Principale, Lachute.

I wrote this account 52 years ago at McGill University and I would like to expand on it now and try to fill in some of the blanks leading up to the constructing of this important historical information as a web site. You can see that this site is the brainchild of Edison Stewart. I will recall how we met as we proceed along the way

After the war, in the late fifties, Lieutenant Jack Paterson (Retired) came to work for the company I was with in Toronto, Jack and I had shared the same cabin on the HMCS Magog. We were in the chemical business and attended the annual trade association meetings connected with the business.

At one of these meetings in the mid-eighties we met Smokey Sturton who was running a chemical manufacturing company in Magog, Québec and we naturally got to talking about our frigate, the HMCS Magog.

For two years in a row we promised Smokey we would visit him and he was to arrange a meeting at City Hall.

Jack and I finally made it the following year and we visited City Hall and met the Mayor and also Jacques Boisvert, a Magog citizen, who was interested in historical matters concerning his home town. This was the start of something important to us.

Through the efforts of Jacques and as many crew members we could contact we arranged a Magog reunion in October 1988. While we were only able to muster 21 sailors (along with their ladies), out of a crew of 150, it was a big success

In 1944 I had visited Magog to represent the Captain and attend a fund raising concert for the benefit of the ship. I met Ernest Pouliot at that time who was Mayor of Magog, I believe, and, it seemed, he was also in charge of the concert. At our 1988 reunion Mr. Pouliot was honorary President of the Reunion Committee and it was a real bonus for me to meet him again after 44 years, and I thanked him for his kindness to me in 1944 and for his work in setting up the reunion.

The town of Magog was very generous to us. We assembled at the cenotaph for a ceremony and marched along Main Street with our Captain, Louis Quick, leading us. We marched to a nearby church for a memorial service. It was a great occasion for those who were present.

In December 2000 I received a phone call from Edison Stewart of Ottawa who was the son of Errol Stewart, a shipmate on the Magog. He and his young son, Justin, were interested in meeting and we did have an enjoyable get together at Christmas time in Ottawa. I left some pictures with them and was able to fill in some blanks about the ship and its travels.

From this beginning you have this web site (This is the Site originally created by Edison Stewart). The German submarine U1223 finished the frigate Magog, but the good news for the crew was that we were transferred as a whole crew to another Canadian fighting ship HMCS Waskesiu where we continued the search for German subs until VE day in May 1945.

Herb Montgomery

The following is from http://www.duffpublishing.ca/waskesiu/27-herb-montgomery.htm

High waves made life difficult on a ship as they rocked the vessel and washed across the decks. In walking on deck, it would be necessary to grab onto the railings to keep a balance or risk being knocked down and swept overboard. The cooks had problems with dishes on the tables and pots and pans on the stove. Both the tables and stove had railings on their edges to corral the items, lest they slip onto the deck as they skated across those surfaces.

Possibly the worst malady was seasickness, which could be a disaster for anyone so stricken. Number One —his executive officer—had been seasick on his first ship, but he was able to conquer it. Many sailors desired so much to be able to do the same.

Herb was born in Montreal, Quebec. He joined the Navy at HMCS Cartier, in Montreal, and took his basic training at HMCS Cornwallis, near Deep Brook, Nova Scotia. He served in the RCNVR from 1942 to 1945 on HMCS Magog and HMCS Waskesiu. He found the food on both ships very good.

When the torpedo hit Magog on October 14, 1944, Herb, a lieutenant, was officer of the day. This did not mean that he was necessarily on the bridge in carrying out his duties. If the action had happened twenty minutes later, many men would have been on the quarterdeck receiving their rum ration, in which case, there would have been many more men lost. There are numerous pictures in Quebec City and on the Magog website illustrating the damage to the ship.

Chaos abounded for nearly one hour on Magog after the torpedo hit. With its developing a list of about 7 degrees, the crew compensated for it by transferring oil from one side of the ship to the other. There was concern that, if the bulkhead would not hold, the ship would sink; but it did hold. In about an hour, the engineer reported that the aft bulkhead was secure and that they were putting up additional framing as a safeguard.

After the ship arrived safely in Levis, Quebec, the crew received a leave of sixty days, after which the entire crew was transferred to HMCS Waskesiu. After workups in Bermuda, they took her to Londonderry via the Azores. They saw no submarine action with Waskesiu and they did not go to Murmansk with her.

Herb had little free time, and much of what he had he spent in working. One of his responsibilities was in censoring mail written by the men on board, a job which he performed quickly as there was never time to read a whole letter. He and the other officers who assisted were looking for information that might be useful to the enemy. Sometimes, he would read memorable lines, often very touching, written to the family back home. This was not a pleasant job.

He was on duty mostly for four hours followed by four hours off, standing watch on bridge. When coming on duty, he received reports from the officer who was finishing his shift. This was necessary so that each officer would be able to stay on top of what was happening.

The commanding officer was a lieutenant from RCNVR and his number one man was his executive officer, whom he called Number One. All officers worked through this executive officer. Liaison between the bridge and the lower deck was through one other man.

Commanding Officer Quick had been cast out of his home at the age of fourteen by his family. Thus, he spent his life on the ocean, starting with being a China coaster going up and down the China coast with cargo ships.

As the Navy was looking for officer candidates near the end of the war, they picked certain men to be interviewed by a review board. Herb was one of these and was sent to King’s College in Halifax for a ninety-day course to learn how to be an officer. Those who were successful were called ninety-day wonders and held the rank of sub-lieutenant.

Since Herb was an officer, he slept in a bunk bed in a cabin which he shared with Lt. Jack Paterson on both ships. He never had the opportunity to sleep in a hammock as he was an AB for only a short time.

Waskesiu was part of an escort group assembling a convoy to Canada in the Irish Sea on V-E Day. After one night at sea on the way to Canada, the crew found that most of the ships had left the convoy, with the fastest ones going ahead, not wanting to travel at the speed of the slowest ship any longer!

She was dispatched to intercept a surrendering German submarine. The officers picked the boarding crew but the navigator could not locate the U-boat. However, it did surrender to an American ship. Herb does not know who the high ranking officer aboard was.

Returning to Halifax two weeks after the riots, they were asked if they wished to serve again in the Japanese war. With most of the crew agreeing to sign on, they sailed Waskesiu through the Panama Canal to Victoria.

Herb does not know the details of the San Diego inquiry following the incident in the Panama Canal. If the inquiry had placed the blame on the captain, he would have known. Apparently, there had been miscommunication between the bridge, with the pilot being in command of the ship’s movements, and the engine room.

A short time later, the war with Japan was over and, slowly but surely, all the men were discharged, having been billeted at Royal Roads College after delivering the ship to Vancouver.

As the war concluded, Herb was anxious to return to university. He obtained a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry degree after which he worked in the chemical distributing business.